How to Write a Podcast Script That Mesmerizes Listeners

Popular podcasts may sound like aimless conversations—and they often are. But most of the time, they’re following some sort of script.

Crafting a great podcast script can be the difference between a show that fizzles and one that sizzles. It’s the heart of your show, guiding the conversation in a way that engages listeners.

So in this article, I’ll teach you how to write a great one. After that, I’ll lay out some rough templates for you to follow.

The Benefits of a Scripted Podcast

Podcasts that don’t follow a script can work, but there are some definite advantages to scripting your show:

  • You can stay on track: A script ensures that your conversation stays focused on the topic at hand. This is especially helpful if you tend to go off on tangents (like I do).
  • You can sound natural: A well-written script can help you sound like you’re having a conversation, even if you’re reading from a teleprompter.
  • You can be more efficient: If you’re tight on time, a script can help you get through your recording with fewer takes.
  • You can plan ahead: A script gives you a chance to think about the best way to structure your show, so you can hit all the key points you want to make.

Now that you know why you should script your podcast, let’s discuss how to write one.

How to Write a Podcast Script (Step-by-Step)

Here’s a step-by-step guide to writing a great podcast script:

  1. Choose a topic
  2. Outline your show
  3. Write your intro
  4. Write your body
  5. Write your outro

1. Choose a Topic

The first step is to choose a topic for your show. This can be anything from current events to pop culture to your niche.

If you’re struggling to come up with a topic, try thinking about the following:

  • What are you passionate about?
  • What do you know a lot about?
  • What do you want to learn more about?
  • What do your listeners want to know?

For example, let’s say you’re a real estate agent.

You could narrow down your topic to “how to buy a home.” But that’s pretty broad. So you could further narrow it down to “how to buy a home in a seller’s market.”

2. Outline Your Show

Once you have a topic, it’s time to start outlining your show. This doesn’t have to be anything fancy—a simple bullet-point list will do.

Start by brainstorming a few ideas for what you want to cover in your show. Then, organize those ideas into a rough structure.

Here’s an example of what that might look like for our real estate agent:

  1. Introduction
  2. What is a seller’s market?
  3. Why is it a good time to buy a home?
  4. How to buy a home in a seller’s market
  5. The pros and cons of buying a home in a seller’s market
  6. How to negotiate in a seller’s market
  7. Conclusion/outro

As you can see, this outline is pretty bare-bones. But that’s okay—you can flesh it out as you write your script.

3. Write Your Intro

It’s time to start writing your script proper.

The first thing you’ll want to do is write your intro. This is where you’ll hook your listeners and give them a taste of what’s to come.

Here are a few tips for writing a great intro:

  • Keep it short: Your intro should be no more than 60 seconds long.
  • Be clear about what your show covers: Tell your listeners what your show is about and why they should care.
  • Make it interesting: Use humor, stories, or other devices to make your intro engaging.

Here’s an example of what a good intro might sound like for the real estate agent:

“Are you thinking about buying a home, but you’re not sure if it’s the right time? In this episode, we’re talking about how to buy a home in a seller’s market.

“I’m your host, Jane Doe, and I’m a real estate agent with XYZ Realty. I’ve helped hundreds of people buy homes, and in this episode, I’m going to share my best tips for how to get the best deal in a seller’s market.

“So whether you’re a first-time homebuyer or you’re looking to upgrade to your dream home, this episode is for you. Let’s get started.”

4. Write Your Body

Now it’s time to write the body of your script. This is where you’ll dive into the meat of your show.

Here are a few tips for writing the body of your script:

  • Keep it conversational: Even if you’re reading from a script, you want your show to sound like a conversation. So write in a natural, conversational style.
  • Be clear and concise: Be sure to hit all the key points you want to make, but don’t ramble.
  • Make it interesting: Use stories, examples, and other devices to keep your listeners engaged.

Here’s an example of what the body of your script might sound like for the real estate agent:

“In this episode, we’re talking about how to buy a home in a seller’s market. But before we get into that, let’s start with the basics:

What is a seller’s market, anyway?

A seller’s market is when there are more buyers than there are homes for sale. This usually happens in areas where there’s a lot of population growth.

It’s a good time to buy a home in a seller’s market because prices are usually rising, so you can expect your home to appreciate in value.

There’s more competition, so you may have to pay more than you would like, but you’re more likely to get the home you want.

Now that we’ve covered the basics let’s talk about how to buy a home in a seller’s market.

The first thing you need to do is get pre-approved for a mortgage. This will show sellers that you’re a serious buyer, and it will give you a better idea of how much home you can afford.

The next step is to start looking for homes. You can do this online, but I recommend working with a real estate agent. They’ll have access to homes that aren’t listed online, and they can help you navigate the process.

Once you find a home you like, the next step is to make an offer. In a seller’s market, you may have to offer more than the asking price to stand out from the competition.

But don’t just blindly accept the first offer the seller makes. Be sure to have your real estate agent negotiate on your behalf to get the best deal possible.”

…you get the point. Have plenty of material to work with, but leave room to be flexible.

5. Write Your Outro

The final step is to write your outro. This is where you’ll thank your listeners and let them know what to do next.

Here are a few tips for writing a great outro:

  • Keep it short: Your outro should be no more than 60 seconds long.
  • Thank your listeners: Be sure to thank your listeners for tuning in.
  • Tell them what to do next: Let your listeners know what they can do if they want more information or if they want to take action on what they learned.

Here’s an example of what a good outro might sound like for the real estate agent:

“Thanks for tuning in to this episode of the Real Estate Agent Podcast.

“If you’re thinking about buying a home in a seller’s market, I hope this episode has given you some helpful tips.

“If you have any questions or are ready to start looking for a home, I’d love to help. You can reach me at 555-1234, or you can email me at [email protected]

Until next time, happy house hunting!”

It’s all about moving the listener in a specific direction.

Podcast Script Templates

To help you get started, here are a few templates you can use for your podcast script.

1. The “Podcast Interview Script”

If your podcast features interviews, this template will come in handy.

INTRO

[State the purpose of your show.]

[Give a brief overview of the show.]

[Thank the listener for tuning in.]

[Introduce your guest.]

[Transition into the interview.]

INTERVIEW

[Ask your first question.]

[Let your guest answer.]

[Ask your second question.]

[Let your guest answer.]

[Transition out of the interview.]

OUTRO

[Summarize the main ideas of the show.]

[Thank the listener for tuning in.]

[Tell the listener what to do next.]

2. The “Podcast How-To Script”

If your podcast gives listeners actionable advice, this template is for you.

INTRO

[State the purpose of your show.]

[Give a brief overview of the show.]

[Thank the listener for tuning in.]

[Introduce the topic of the show.]

[Transition into the body of the show.]

BODY

[State the problem your listener is trying to solve.]

[Introduce your solution.]

[Walk your listener through your solution step-by-step.]

[Transition out of the body of the show.]

OUTRO

[Summarize the main ideas of the show.]

[Thank the listener for tuning in.]

[Tell the listener what to do next.]

3. The “Podcast Storytelling Script”

If your podcast tells stories, this template is for you.

INTRO

[State the purpose of your show.]

[Give a brief overview of the show.]

[Thank the listener for tuning in.]

[Introduce the story you’re going to tell.]

[Transition into the story.]

STORY

[Start of the story.]

[Middle of the story.]

[End of the story.]

OUTRO

[Summarize the main ideas of the show.]

[Thank the listener for tuning in.]

[Tell the listener what to do next.]

4. The “Podcast News Script”

If your podcast gives listeners the latest news and updates, this template is for you.

INTRO

[State the purpose of your show.]

[Give a brief overview of the show.]

[Thank the listener for tuning in.]

[Introduce the topic of the show.]

[Transition into the body]

BODY

[Share the latest news.]

[Offer your analysis and opinion.]

[Look ahead to what’s next.]

[Transition out of the body of the show.]

OUTRO

[Summarize the main ideas of the show.]

[Thank the listener for tuning in.]

[Tell the listener what to do next.]

Time to Share Your Story

Writing a podcast script can help you plan and organize your show, but it’s not necessary to produce a great podcast.

So don’t get too hung up on the details—just start with a simple outline and go from there.

If you have any questions, drop a comment, and I’ll respond ASAP.

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